what gas engine? 2020 F350: 6.2 Gas or 7.3 L Gas? - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 02-09-2019, 03:10 AM   #1
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Question what gas engine? 2020 F350: 6.2 Gas or 7.3 L Gas?

what gas engine? 2020 F350: 6.2 Gas or 7.3 L Gas?

Hi all

Lots of smart people here.... thus this question here.

Any guesses as to the increase in price from the 6.2 L gasser to the 7.3 L gasser?

Our plan is to custom order a gasser 2020 F350 with just the options we want, and none that we don’t…. and put a 9.5’ Hallmark pop up truck camper on it full time. No, we will almost never tow anything. We hate towing.

I am told that our Hallmark pop up truck camper, “wet” could be about 3,000 lbs, or maybe a little less (approximately) so I’ll have the F350 built with a lot of carrying capacity.

If it was you (and you didn’t want diesel) what engine would you buy? the 6.2 L gasser or the 7.3 L gasser?

Diesel doesn’t make sense for us, as it adds a ton to the cost, plus weights a *lot* more than the gas engine, so it effectively reduces our max payload.
We also like to go far, far off the beaten path, and those places often don’t have diesel to sell. We dont want to worry about range ever.

Plus we would never drive enough to make up the difference in cost via higher efficiency.

So the question comes down to: do we get the tried and true 6.2-liter gas V8, probably around 385 horsepower and 430 pound-feet of torque (current specs)
or do we spend the extra $ to get the new 7.3-liter pushrod V8.

One unknown variable… the new 10 speed transmission sounds nice… that would be nice to have. I wonder if the 6.2L gasser would even be available with the new 10 speed transmission….. Hmmm…

Thanks…. here is a copy paste of some info, from the internet:

and I quote: …”The base (Super Duty) option is a carryover 6.2-liter gasoline V8, which will likely have output ratings similar to the current model's 385 horsepower and 430 pound-feet of torque.

Next up is an all-new 7.3-liter pushrod V8, claimed to be the most powerful gas engine in Super Duty history.

Finally, there's a new, third-generation 6.7-liter Power Stroke turbodiesel V8. It has a new turbo, new internals and a new 36,000-psi fueling system to deliver power; the outgoing engine was rated for 450 hp and 935 lb-ft.

Those engines now mate to a new 10-speed automatic transmission, which weighs just 3.5 pounds more than and fits into the same physical space as the outgoing six-speed. (The base 6.2-liter engine will still be offered with the six-speed on low-cost trims.)

Ford promises improved efficiency from the new transmission. In addition to the expected Tow/Haul, the 10-speed adds extra driving modes: Slippery, Deep Sand and Snow, and Eco, the last of which feels like a token effort in a heavy-duty pickup truck.”

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Old 02-09-2019, 03:52 PM   #2
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Not an expert here but I drive a 2010 F 150 with the 5.4L and 6 speed tranny. The transmission has always beed "clunky" with very hard downshifts on occasion but not always. I've always worried that I would leave the transmission all over the road sometime but it hasn't happened yet and I have 137,000 miles on it now. Everything I read and hear about the 10 speed is that it is great. Yours would be a newer heaver duty design of the existing 10 speed so it isn't a complete new design. I would go for whichever engine that comes with the 10 speed.
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Old 02-09-2019, 04:44 PM   #3
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It's hard to imagine that an F-350 which is not towing can need anything more than the current 6.2L. On the other hand, the new 7.3 L might deliver better fuel economy due to more advanced design - it's impossible to tell at this point, with so little information released. There is always the concern with buying the first year of any vehicle, engine, or transmission, as it may not have the bugs worked out.

It makes little sense to keep multiple redundant transmissions in production, so Ford will probably use the new 10R140 higher-capacity 10-speed in all vehicles currently using the 6R140 within a few years... but the transition never happens in a single year, so I'm not surprised that the 6.2 L will still come with the 6R140 in 2020 in at least some cases. So...
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFDavis50 View Post
I would go for whichever engine that comes with the 10 speed.
I agree. But then I'm biased against obsolete transmissions by being stuck with a 4R100 in my motorhome, which is aggravating. If it were economically feasible (I'm sure it's not), and I were driving it more, I would swap in the 6R140 which is now used in the same chassis with the same engine.

The question might be how much it costs to move up to the trim level that lets you buy the 10-speed with the 6.2L, and whether it would make more sense to just buy the 7.3L and get the 10-speed that comes with it.
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Old 02-09-2019, 05:21 PM   #4
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Be certain to get the DRW model and not the SRW. It will be a lot more stable with the very heavy load you will be carrying; especially in cross winds.
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Old 02-09-2019, 08:36 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by EdColorado View Post
Be certain to get the DRW model and not the SRW. It will be a lot more stable with the very heavy load you will be carrying; especially in cross winds.
except we want to go on FSR and over rocks (slowly) and DRW is very bad for that....

so SRW i think.

10 ply E rated. many folks are doing these with Pop Up Trailers... they love the setup. very stable.

thx
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Old 02-09-2019, 11:21 PM   #6
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Hey John- I would have hated towing a Gen2 21 with an Acura MDX too. Maybe if you tried an F150 ecoboost you might like it and save a bunch of $$$.
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Old 02-09-2019, 11:26 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Rossue View Post
Hey John- I would have hated towing a Gen2 21 with an Acura MDX too. Maybe if you tried an F150 ecoboost you might like it and save a bunch of $$$.
The thought did cross my mind a few times... however having rented a 24' Sprinter van conversion, and a 22' Transit camper....

plus i dont like towing by myself - as I have the opportunity to camp sometimes alone...

i just dont like towing, period. I like being one vehicle

i know that sounds crazy on an Escape forum... to a bunch of people who all tow....



and we love our palatial Escape 21....

but i think a self contained (much more cramped, granted) Ford F350 - 4x4 - with 9.5' Hallmark Pop Up will suit us better.

J
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Old 02-10-2019, 12:10 AM   #8
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SRW and DRW, and stability

Dual-rear-wheel trucks look like they should be much more stable, but lateral stability is determined approximately by the track width between tire centres, which isn't as much more on a DRW than an SRW as it looks (because the DRW tire combination is so wide with the space between the tires). The DRW does have 7.5" wider track, but the difference in overall truck width is much more than that. The best arrangement for stability would be a wide-track SRW, but although that's available in Europe on some chassis-cabs, it's not available here in anything from the factory, and specifically not in pickup trucks.

A DRW F-350 is about 400 pounds heavier than an equivalent SRW F-350.

If you really want lateral stability you can get an F-450 (which has a 5.7" wider-track front axle), but that's a DRW-only model, among other issues.

If the 7.5" wider track on the DRW models is simply due to a rear axle housing that much wider (with the same bearing assemblies bolted to it, but with hubs having different flange offsets to suit the wheel offset), it would theoretically be possible to swap a DRW axle housing and axle shafts into an SRW truck (using SRW rear hubs to get the right offset and bolt pattern) and use fender flares to cover the tires, obtaining the wider track without as much width as the DRW, and without the dually tire problems off-road. The SRW and DRW axles would need to be the same model (Ford uses Sterling 10.5" in some SuperDuty pickup configurations, and Dana in others). Of course, this would need to be confirmed, and most people wouldn't want to do this on a new truck; they would just run outset rear wheels (which is bad for the bearings).
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Old 02-10-2019, 12:16 AM   #9
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Tires

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Originally Posted by Losangeles View Post
10 ply E rated
Well, Load Range E and 10-ply "rating"... which mean the same thing. Since that means 80 PSI maximum inflation - which can be brutal for ride comfort and bad for traction (especially off-highway) - and they need it to match the GAWR, I hope you won't need the full GAWR so they don't need maximum inflation.
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Old 02-10-2019, 12:56 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
It's hard to imagine that an F-350 which is not towing can need anything more than the current 6.2L. On the other hand, the new 7.3 L might deliver better fuel economy due to more advanced design - it's impossible to tell at this point, with so little information released. There is always the concern with buying the first year of any vehicle, engine, or transmission, as it may not have the bugs worked out.
i second that, I was a Ford mechanic for eighteen years and it sometimes took several years to get the bugs out.

I can’t imagine you needing more than a properly equipped F 350 SRW for a pop up camper. You said it could weigh up tp 3,000 lbs. wet. Well, a lot of campers hauled on 350’s weigh that much dry. I think the inconvenience of DRW loading, parking, and general maneuvering would only be worth it if you were hauling a tank of a camper. Weighing 4,000 lbs. in fact look at the Lance camper website and you can punch in different trucks and see what weight campers they suggest.
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