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Old 09-20-2018, 03:11 AM   #1
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Drain Hose For What

Found this drain hose underneath on my 5.0TA driver side just in front of fresh water tank. Not sure what it is connected to, but appears to be drain for something. Sits somewhat under the refrigerator area. I know the refrigerator has drain hose in the back just behind the exterior access panel. Anyone know what this drain hose is connected to or what is feeding it? Definitely not connected to fresh water tank.
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File Type: jpg Drain Hose_20180919_130606.jpg (161.0 KB, 49 views)
File Type: jpg Drain Hose_5.0TAEscapeFloorPlan.jpg (69.0 KB, 21 views)
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:46 AM   #2
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Could it be condensate drain hose for fridge
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:51 AM   #3
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Yes, there is a hole in the bottom of your refer exterior compartment, to allow propane in case of leaks or condensate to drain out.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:14 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpaharley2008 View Post
Yes, there is a hole in the bottom of your refer exterior compartment, to allow propane in case of leaks or condensate to drain out.
That was my guess as well. On our trailer the drain line jogs inside and then goes down through the floor right near the fresh water tank. You could always pour a little water down it and see if we are right.

The first pic is Jim's newer 19 that has a drain line that also comes from the refrigerator itself. The second picture is with an older RM2510 fridge which has no drain line from the fridge.
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File Type: jpg fridge area drain.jpg (179.5 KB, 27 views)
File Type: jpg fridge area drain 2010 19.jpg (277.7 KB, 26 views)
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:21 AM   #5
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That makes sense, Senior moment for me!
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:19 AM   #6
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It would be prudent to check the open flow from time to time to make sure that some winged creature for forest varmint hasn't decided to over-winter or nest in the opening of that dangling hose. Here in the South, that would be a huge temptation for carpenter bees and mud daubers. We've had mud daubers block the drain hose for our car's air conditioner in the past. You drive around a corner, and first thing you know, your passenger's foot is soaked with accumulated condensation water. We strapped a little piece of nylon screen door screen around the exterior opening. No more wet feet.
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:48 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by War Eagle View Post
It would be prudent to check the open flow from time to time to make sure that some winged creature for forest varmint hasn't decided to over-winter or nest in the opening of that dangling hose. Here in the South, that would be a huge temptation for carpenter bees and mud daubers. We've had mud daubers block the drain hose for our car's air conditioner in the past. You drive around a corner, and first thing you know, your passenger's foot is soaked with accumulated condensation water. We strapped a little piece of nylon screen door screen around the exterior opening. No more wet feet.

For the drain hose, you could attach some netting with tape to prevent critter entry.
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Old 09-20-2018, 01:26 PM   #8
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As a side effect, you now know the actual size of your freshwater tank. The label is visible, showing that it is a model 2240 from Alcaro Plastics (of Kelowna), and their website says that it has a capacity of 107 litres, 23.5 Imperial gallons, or 28.2 U.S. gallons. That means that the "28 gallon" capacity listed on the Escape website is in U.S. gallons.
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