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Old 09-30-2017, 09:13 PM   #1
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Propane Lantern

Hi, I'm new here. Thinking about a 17A Escape. Has ETI ever installed a propane lantern? We're upgrading from a 13' 1969 Cardinal, and we have enjoyed the propane lantern. Sometimes it provides just enough heat to keep things comfy. Thanks for all of the tips I've seen on the forum.
Tom
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Old 09-30-2017, 09:47 PM   #2
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I haven't heard of Escape installing a gas lamp, but that doesn't mean they haven't done it.

Although these were common in the distant past, I don't think that it would be allowed by the current standard which Escape follows (CSA Z240 RV Series), because it is an unvented gas-burning appliance. That means that it seems unlikely to me - although of course I don't speak for Escape - that Escape would be willing to install one.
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Old 10-01-2017, 01:18 AM   #3
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I would definitely avoid an unvented propane lantern. The newer Escapes seal pretty well, so you'd be building up a lot of carbon monoxide unless you had a fan on or at least a window open.
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Old 10-01-2017, 04:22 AM   #4
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While I personally wouldn't install a propane lantern inside my trailer because they do create a lot of heat and carbon dioxide, I fail to see/understand how it would be any less unvented than a stove without a range hood, and many people choose to exclude the range hood on their build sheets, relying on their ceiling vent instead. Had one in the family travel trailer when I was a child. I think a second question is if Escape would install it, are these wall mounted propane lanterns even manufactured any more.
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Old 10-01-2017, 07:40 AM   #5
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I would definitely avoid an unvented propane lantern. The newer Escapes seal pretty well, so you'd be building up a lot of carbon monoxide unless you had a fan on or at least a window open.
Although this is the primary concern, another negative effect is the moisture that is produced by burning gas, which could create a condensation problem.

I understand the appeal with the novelty and the association to your past trailer, but most definitely would not want the risk, nor the hassle of using a gas lamp. I too doubt Escape would install it, but once they sell it to you, you are free to do as you wish from their point of view.
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Old 10-01-2017, 08:06 AM   #6
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Me thinks the above info means there is a reason they are no longer being installed in campers anymore......
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Old 10-01-2017, 08:49 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by C&G in FL View Post
...are these wall mounted propane lanterns even manufactured any more.
Yes, indeed they are. I use them outside at my cabin. I'm off grid there (generator/battery bank/inverter) so am mindful of power usage. And I agree with the above comments about heat, gas build-up, and condensation in an small virtually air-tight space.

https://www.northernpropaneproduct.c...ghts-humphrey/
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Old 10-01-2017, 12:28 PM   #8
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I had friends that had a cabin on a lake a long way from any AC. They had wall sconce gas lanterns for lighting & a 1950 kerosene absorption refrigerator (still going strong in 2006). Water was pumped daily form a small spring to a 55 gallon drum uphill from the cabin - standard plumbing, including a flush toilet!

The gas lanterns did provide a pleasant light (and a bit of heat), but I agree that in a well sealed small trailer, both condensation & CO could be a problem.
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Old 10-01-2017, 02:32 PM   #9
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While I personally wouldn't install a propane lantern inside my trailer because they do create a lot of heat and carbon dioxide, I fail to see/understand how it would be any less unvented than a stove without a range hood, and many people choose to exclude the range hood on their build sheets, relying on their ceiling vent instead.
The moisture and other combustion products of a gas-burning lamp are obviously undesirable, but the heat is normally considered a desirable product of the lamp's operation, when used in cool evenings. If the interior is too warm, then another light source would normally be chosen... in this century, anyway.

The oxygen depletion and carbon monoxide risks are similar to a stove, although the lamp is a very small burner. The stove (and oven) are exempted from the CSA standard's prohibition of unvented gas-burning appliances, but cooking appliances are used for short periods, with ventilation, and are continuously attended. While a lamp may only be used while the occupants are awake, it would routinely be used for hours at a time.

The roof vent, in combination with an open window, is fine for ventilation. The advantage of a range hood is mostly in removing cooking oils and odours with minimum effect on the rest of the interior, rather than ventilation for safety.
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Old 10-01-2017, 03:56 PM   #10
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The moisture and other combustion products of a gas-burning lamp are obviously undesirable, but the heat is normally considered a desirable product of the lamp's operation, when used in cool evenings. If the interior is too warm, then another light source would normally be chosen... in this century, anyway.

The oxygen depletion and carbon monoxide risks are similar to a stove, although the lamp is a very small burner. The stove (and oven) are exempted from the CSA standard's prohibition of unvented gas-burning appliances, but cooking appliances are used for short periods, with ventilation, and are continuously attended. While a lamp may only be used while the occupants are awake, it would routinely be used for hours at a time.

The roof vent, in combination with an open window, is fine for ventilation. The advantage of a range hood is mostly in removing cooking oils and odours with minimum effect on the rest of the interior, rather than ventilation for safety.
To clarify, I never stated that installation of a propane lantern would meet CSA standards; I merely stated that a stove is often "unvented." Nor did I comment on the length of time any particular appliance would be used. I see no reason to State or to restate the obvious.
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Old 10-01-2017, 06:15 PM   #11
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We had a gas light in our 1963 Shasta. Besides the above, I'd worry about the heat from the lamp melting the plastic vinyl wall covering in an Escape.
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