To Dump Or Not Dump - Page 4 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

Go Back   Escape Trailer Owners Community > Escape Tech > Problem Solving | Owners helping each other
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-30-2015, 10:21 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
BCnomad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: O town, British Columbia
Trailer: 2014 Escape 21 "Lightning"
Posts: 1,327
^^ thats why I dont really pay attention to the gauge much...more the days that pass.
__________________

__________________
When you look for advice, make sure it's from someone towing your trailer, in your backyard, with the same expectations
BCnomad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2015, 10:30 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
gbaglo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: North Vancouver, British Columbia
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B - "Toad". '08 Toyota RAV4 V6
Posts: 10,729
Years ago, Omni magazine did a photo feature. Beautiful photographs of broccoli, eggs and such natural foods, with the list of the chemical components that they are made of.
__________________

__________________
2009 Escape 17B "Toad"
2008 Toyota RAV4 V6 Sport
North Vancouver, British Columbia

What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
gbaglo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2015, 10:37 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: none, Washington, D.C.
Trailer: None
Posts: 1,071
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
Every part of this earth is made of chemicals. Geo method is chemicals.
I think the problem is usually chunks of TP getting hung up on the sensor probe.
We use the geo method and it has worked quite well for us . We have encountered campgrounds that will not allow you to use their dump station if you have added commercial chemical treatments to your holding tanks . I asked why the ban on chemically treated waste and was told that the chemically treated waste had to be treated in a different manner than nontreated waste and was more costly to dispose of.
steve dunham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2015, 10:55 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
gbaglo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: North Vancouver, British Columbia
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B - "Toad". '08 Toyota RAV4 V6
Posts: 10,729
Peculiar. Given that poop itself consists of chemicals.
I'm curious how they assess the contents of the black tank so that they can ban "chemicals".
__________________
2009 Escape 17B "Toad"
2008 Toyota RAV4 V6 Sport
North Vancouver, British Columbia

What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
gbaglo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2015, 11:20 PM   #35
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,052
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbaglo View Post
I'm curious how they assess the contents of the black tank so that they can ban "chemicals".
Or, even if they could tell what is in the black tank effluent, how they would decide that sodium citrate, carbonic acid, salt, detergent, and chlorine bleach are not chemicals, while other chemicals are chemicals.

Some black tank treatments contain formaldehyde. If that is specifically what people are concerned about, I wish they would just say so.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2015, 11:56 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
gbaglo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: North Vancouver, British Columbia
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B - "Toad". '08 Toyota RAV4 V6
Posts: 10,729
Salt? I think you mean sodium chloride ( NaCl ).
Bleach? You mean, Sodium hypochlorite is a chemical compound with the formula NaClO. It is composed of a sodium cation (Na
+
) and a hypochlorite anion (ClO

); it may also be viewed as the sodium salt of hypochlorous acid. When dissolved in water it is commonly known as bleach, or liquid bleach.[1] Sodium hypochlorite is practically and chemically distinct from chlorine.[2] Sodium hypochlorite is frequently used as a disinfectant or a bleaching agent.
__________________
2009 Escape 17B "Toad"
2008 Toyota RAV4 V6 Sport
North Vancouver, British Columbia

What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
gbaglo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 01:29 AM   #37
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,052
Yeah, I was going to expand them all, but the detergent ingredient list is just way too long...
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 11:28 AM   #38
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: none, Washington, D.C.
Trailer: None
Posts: 1,071
The answer I was given by the campground owners was that when they had their septic tanks
pumped ,if the tank contained holding tank chemicals the cost was $300 if the tank did not contain holding tank chemicals the cost was $125 .The price difference was due to legally required disposal methods . There was also a fine levied by the state if they improperly disposed of the waste .There were NO dump station guards at the dump station just large signs informing you that if you use commercial holding tank chemicals ,you were not to dump.
The people who own the campgrounds get to set the rules on their property.
I was told Biodegradable soaps or Ridex were not an issue.
steve dunham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 11:16 PM   #39
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1700
Posts: 9,052
There's the key: "commercial holding tank chemicals" are banned and "Biodegradable soaps or Ridex were not an issue". This means:
  • the camper is expected to understand what was used and is trusted to act accordingly
  • one assumption seems to be that "commercial holding tank chemicals" contain some specific undesirable chemicals (probably formaldehydes), but this is not true... and which chemicals is not specified
  • another assumption is that whatever else you dump in is okay, which is also not necessarily true (the consumer can buy nasty and inappropriate stuff and some web page will tell them to dump it in)
  • although the ban is on "commercial holding tank chemicals", non-biodegradable soaps are apparently a problem, too... but not banned?
Again, if the agency handling the waste says something makes it more expensive, they should what that is... and something meaningful like "formaldehyde" would be a lot more useful than some vague comment about "commercial holding tank chemicals".

There are commercial holding tank chemical mixtures which contain formaldehyde, and they are probably the sort of thing they are trying to avoid. There are also commercially produced and distributed chemical mixture for treating holding tanks which contain nothing which would require special waste treatment. The "Geo method" stuff is a mixture of chemical mixtures, each of which is commercially produced but not intended for holding tanks, and might be a concern.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2015, 07:04 AM   #40
Senior Member
 
C&G in FL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Tampa Bay Area, Florida
Trailer: 2015 5.0TA
Posts: 1,441
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve dunham View Post
The answer I was given by the campground owners was that when they had their septic tanks
pumped ,if the tank contained holding tank chemicals the cost was $300 if the tank did not contain holding tank chemicals the cost was $125 .The price difference was due to legally required disposal methods . There was also a fine levied by the state if they improperly disposed of the waste .There were NO dump station guards at the dump station just large signs informing you that if you use commercial holding tank chemicals ,you were not to dump.
The people who own the campgrounds get to set the rules on their property.
I was told Biodegradable soaps or Ridex were not an issue.
This really sounds like a crock (pun intended) to me. Having worked with water/wastewater utility systems for much of my working career, I can say with 100% certainty that the inflow into waste water treatment plants often contains far more hazardous/dangerous chemicals than those put in RV holding tanks. Septic tank pumpers haul their loads to the waste water treatment plant and the contents are merged with what is flowing into the plant from the sanitary sewer system. When the WWTP gets inundated with a large plug of chemicals that affect the microorganisms breaking down the organic matter, it is called an "upset." The amount of holding tank chemical coming into the plant from a septic pumper is nowhere enough to cause an upset, given the huge quantities being collected from all the sources of waste water. Last I knew, WWTP workers were not chemically analyzing the contents of honey wagons before allowing them to dump. Maybe that has changed, but I doubt it. And proper disposal of waste means that it undergoes treatment; it cannot just be dumped on the ground in some remote location or on hay fields.
__________________

__________________
Carl
2015 F150 2.7 EcoBoost (Big Spot)
2015 5.0TA (Little Elsie)
"What a long, strange trip it's been....."
C&G in FL is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off






» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.