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Old 10-13-2013, 04:16 PM   #1
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Range hood and cold weather camping

Hi, a question for those of you who do cold weather camping with your Escapes, and who have range hoods. Do you find any issues in cold weather from coldness entering trailer through range hood vent?

It seems like you can get the extra insulation and thermal windows, but cold (or even hot) could still come in.

It seems like a minor detail ( and a minor source of coldness!), but it's a thought that occurred to me. Just looking for reasons for and against ordering the range hood. Thanks! j
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Old 10-13-2013, 05:04 PM   #2
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Hi , how cold are you thinking. We are not winter campers, but very much "shoulder "season campers . We just got back from a 6 week trip to the other wet coast , and really feel the extra insulation and thermal windows were worth every penny . Did not notice any problem with the range hood allowing in cold . We used it quite a it and found it very helpful - did most cooking indoors . Did lock the flap after use because wind can catch , and that could be annoying . We had only 1 morning with real frost , a lot of nights down to 0-5 c , so not overly cold . Glad we have the hood fan. The only heat source we used was the Braun 170/174 , similar ( or same ) as CPAHarley built into his 19 , it was quiet and kept us very comfortable .
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Old 10-13-2013, 05:04 PM   #3
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For the short time we have owned our 19 with a range hood and camping in cool weather hard to say the range hood contributed to additional heat loss. In near freezing temperatures the plastic flap covering the range hood vent probably leaks a bit of cold air, but I don't think it is significant. I like the idea of venting moist air out of the trailer, e.g. cooking spaghetti, particularly when on the coast where there is humidity. In dryer climates I think it might be less important. Don't know about Transport Canada's requirements for having a hood with a cook top/stove.
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Old 10-13-2013, 05:35 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gharper View Post
For the short time we have owned our 19 with a range hood and camping in cool weather hard to say the range hood contributed to additional heat loss. In near freezing temperatures the plastic flap covering the range hood vent probably leaks a bit of cold air, but I don't think it is significant. I like the idea of venting moist air out of the trailer, e.g. cooking spaghetti, particularly when on the coast where there is humidity. In dryer climates I think it might be less important. Don't know about Transport Canada's requirements for having a hood with a cook top/stove.
Hi, thanks a lot for the input. I too like the idea of the range hood. I live in the rainy PNW and camping seems to usually involve rain, so I'm thinking of the full kitchen ensemble of stove/oven/range hood. Just seems that many people eliminate the range hood and I wanted to explore all options. Thanks. j
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Old 10-13-2013, 05:57 PM   #5
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We deleted the vent hood and added a light. We had a 17' Casita - and only used the vent 2-3 times in 8 years - running the ceiling vent took care of the odors/steam more efficiently and more quietly.

Also the kitchen is much more open without the hood, and we added a standard light fixture where it was.

And we added the opening kitchen window - more light and air are always (well - not in the summer in Arizona) good.

For a discussion of the hood see: Stove Hood / Vent

Picture without the hood: Kibitka Escape: Escape 19 Interior Photos, Part 2

Picture with the hood: Flickr: escapett's Photostream
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Old 10-13-2013, 06:08 PM   #6
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The photos without the range hood that jamman provides looks nice. We did find the max fan and our opening window above the sink provides very good air flow. The light in the hood isn't LED and we find hardly worth using.
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Old 10-13-2013, 06:10 PM   #7
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Here is my $.02 worth. In my 19 I opted out since the stove was next to door and close to the overhead and I had an awning window over sink. Now that awning windows are no longer available , I decided to get the hood and put the stove away from the door towards the dinette where it will not interfere with clearance. The stove vent can be my awning window now, I can prop it open during rainy days and not worry about water, still look out my kitchen window and the vent can supply my intake at night for my MaxxFann. I will use it in the winter as my source of air for condensation elimination and if I close it, I can stuff a piece of foam on top in the vent to make it less prone to cold air leaks. In addition I plan on replacing the worthless vent light with a red led light that will be my night light at dusk.
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Old 10-13-2013, 07:35 PM   #8
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I have the range hood and no kitchen window. No problem with cold air ingress unless I want it by running the max air in exhaust mode.

I start the camping season in March in the BC interior so -6 - 10c (15 - 20f) at night. I've found that the colder it is the more important it is to try to cook as much as possible outdoors especially boiling water, making pasta etc. Once water vapor condenses indoors on cold surfaces it takes energy and time to re-evaporate it, even more if it's a solid :-( in a remote closet behind clothes, linen etc.
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Old 10-13-2013, 08:15 PM   #9
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Like Gabeck we are also shoulder season season campers; we just got back from a 3 week trip to the Rockies and Kootenays. We leave our stove vent open 24/7 when camping using it as our source of fresh air. I clip it open with a clothes peg and only clamp it shut when travelling. When we cook inside I put then Maxfan on the lowest setting and it draws air through the stove vent picks up any moisture from the cooking and pulls it outside ...... works like a charm even when its raining.

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Old 10-13-2013, 08:22 PM   #10
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Why not reverse the MaxxFann and have the cooking blown out the stove vent in those certain cooking situations? Is it not the purpose the vent was designed for?
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