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Old 05-08-2016, 10:06 PM   #1
LRL
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Outlets

We're unclear about why we might want additional outlets, and what we would do with them. Also, why 12V vs AC? Why a USB port rather than an AC plug with USB adaptor? Can USB adapters work with a 12V plug? And why might I want outside power, and why might one type be better than another?

So many questions! Thank you for any and all answers.
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Old 05-08-2016, 10:20 PM   #2
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Here's a good place to start: 12V outlets on Escape 19

It all depends on what equipment you want to run and what kind of power is required (AC or DC). And before anyone tells you that you must have a zillion outlets, I will state that I have only one 12V outlet and it gets used maybe (and that's a big maybe) one hour a day. I have three AC outlets (used only when plugged into shore power) and I only use one of them for a cube heater.
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Old 05-08-2016, 10:20 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by LRL View Post
We're unclear about why we might want additional outlets, and what we would do with them. Also, why 12V vs AC? Why a USB port rather than an AC plug with USB adaptor? Can USB adapters work with a 12V plug? And why might I want outside power, and why might one type be better than another?

So many questions! Thank you for any and all answers.
Hi Folks, are you new to trailers? Just wondering how basic to make an explanation of why 12v vs AC.
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Old 05-08-2016, 10:28 PM   #4
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12V always works (unless your battery is dead) but for AC to work, you need to be plugged in at a campground (or generator) if you aren't using an inverter (12V to AC.) Microwave and Air only work on AC.

USB ports are available as part of both AC and 12V outlets; USB is 5VDC power so can come from either source. Useful for charging phones/electronics.

Exterior 12V outlets are handy for powering a 12V air compressor should it be needed due to a low tire while on the road to get to a tire service place.
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Old 05-08-2016, 10:39 PM   #5
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Assume we know nothing. You probably won't be far from accurate.
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Old 05-08-2016, 11:18 PM   #6
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Assume we know nothing. You probably won't be far from accurate.
There are lots of threads that discuss this topic, but I'd suggest reading the website "The 12 Volt side of life". Excellent resource on RV power basics.

The 12volt Side of Life (Part 1)

The lights, fridge, etc in your RV run on 12V DC power - Direct Current. Your home runs on AC power - Alternating Current. They're quite different from each other. When you're connected to shore power at an RV park, the RV systems still run on 12 Volt DC power, but that's where the converter comes in - changing AC (household) power to DC. When you're not connected to shore power, you don't need to convert the power, because your battery or batteries are supplying 12 Volts DC.

Once you understand how a 12V DC power system works, the rest is much easier to understand. Then you get into receptacle types, inverters, solar, 6V dual batteries vs single 12v batteries, etc. It may sound complex but in reality it's simpler than you think. You can be well versed in RV power systems in pretty short order if you are willing to read and learn.
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Old 05-08-2016, 11:49 PM   #7
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Just as at home, when you need an outlet in a certain place, it is convenient to have it. Recommend outlets both ends of the trailer (and/or the middle such as for a compressor to use on the tires). We use all of our extra ones but not all of their standard ones. USBs for phones and iPads and other items.

If you get solar and an inverter, you can run anything but air conditioning, although high-draws such as the microwave are limited. If you expect to only be plugged in at campgrounds, no need for solar or inverter. Campgrounds, however, may have many sites that have no electric and they sometimes fill their electric sites. So you might be interested in solar anyway.
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Old 05-08-2016, 11:56 PM   #8
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In our opinion you can't have enough 12v sources. iPads, iPhones, Apple Watches, rechargeable flashlights, inflator pump, TV if not hooked up to campground power, rechargeable bluetooth speakers - in our Casita we have added extra 12v outlets and they all seem to get used a lot. Handy to have at least one or two 110 v AC outlets outside too for a fan, small heater when it's chilly but not cold, an induction cooktop or perhaps some lights (turned off at 10 pm of course). Admittedly we may be a little over the top in power consumption but we sure do have fun whether dry camping or with full hookups. Better to have the outlets and not need them than be frustrated that they aren't available.
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Old 05-08-2016, 11:56 PM   #9
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There are lots of threads that discuss this topic, but I'd suggest reading the website "The 12 Volt side of life". Excellent resource on RV power basics.



The 12volt Side of Life (Part 1)



The lights, fridge, etc in your RV run on 12V DC power - Direct Current. Your home runs on AC power - Alternating Current. They're quite different from each other. When you're connected to shore power at an RV park, the RV systems still run on 12 Volt DC power, but that's where the converter comes in - changing AC (household) power to DC. When you're not connected to shore power, you don't need to convert the power, because your battery or batteries are supplying 12 Volts DC.



Once you understand how a 12V DC power system works, the rest is much easier to understand. Then you get into receptacle types, inverters, solar, 6V dual batteries vs single 12v batteries, etc. It may sound complex but in reality it's simpler than you think. You can be well versed in RV power systems in pretty short order if you are willing to read and learn.


Well said Robert. Less than a year ago I knew nothing about RV electrical systems. Today I'm rewiring the 12v panel, installing solar, wireless fridge sensors, fans, etc. It just takes some patience and a tenacity to understand. This forum is a great resource for all these things!
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Old 05-09-2016, 12:24 AM   #10
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Thank you all for your help. I guess what I'm unclear on is the difference between DC and AC plugs... I only know AC. Are there special DC plugs, for DC appliances?
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