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Old 01-03-2018, 08:07 PM   #1
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Tire Discussion

Pat, how do you like the Maxxis tires? I've no experience with them.
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Old 01-03-2018, 08:29 PM   #2
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Pat, how do you like the Maxxis tires? I've no experience with them.
So far like very much . The Carlisles were ok for 1st 3 years plus years but they keep losing air and I was getting flats . I bought the Maxxis for a good sale price , picked them up , I removed my wheels 2 at a time and took to our Costco and they installed on the rims . We buy only Michelins for our truck and just removed the Subaru's ,Yokohama 's , put Michelins on Subaru . I will tell you the rubber is stout like Michelins . Bought 8008 D 's . Never get flats with Michelins and expect the same with Maxxis . I will say bought tire sensors also to know what is going on back there. Last flat didn't know how long we drove on a flat coming from Washington State trip . Kind of scared us . So heard good things about the Maxxis . Pat
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Old 01-03-2018, 08:33 PM   #3
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I'll keep them in mind in a year or two when I'm looking for tires. Thanks.
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Old 01-03-2018, 08:37 PM   #4
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I will tell you the rubber is stout like Michelins . Pat
I am curious how you determined that.
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Old 01-03-2018, 09:21 PM   #5
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I am curious how you determined that.
Glen I had to remove all the tires and then replace with new mounted tires . The Maxxis were a lot heavier rubber and sidewalls . Also when I picked tires up and bought home I noticed the rubber was a lot more robust . It has to do also with all the plys . They also come with a 6 year warranty .Pat
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Old 01-03-2018, 10:01 PM   #6
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Bought the Maxxis 8008 Load range C two years ago and they have worn very similarly to the Carlisles. Both seem to go down near 4/32 at 20-24K. Will probably try the Goodyear Endurance next.
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Old 01-03-2018, 10:43 PM   #7
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S
I will tell you the rubber is stout like Michelins . Bought 8008 D 's . Never get flats with Michelins
Pat
Ever read reviews and noticed people say good and bad things about the same product.

My original truck tires are Goodyear Wranglers. They have over 60,000 miles of pretty hard use on them. Still lot's of legal tread but I wanted to replace them before we head South in a few weeks.

At 30,000 miles I replaced two of the Goodyears. One had been damaged on the Alaska hwy. and I used the second as a "proper" spare. I put on two Michelins. They have about the same amount of tread left as the Goodyears with twice the milage.

I commented about this to the tire store and they made two comments. Yeah, Michelins don't seem to last as long and we'll give you two of the Goodyears at half price to replace them. Sounded good to me so tomorrow I'm back to all Goodyears.

Next will be trailer tires. Don't have the energy now to wade through all the pros and cons of each type. Enough tires for this week.

Ron
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Old 01-03-2018, 11:02 PM   #8
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Bought the Maxxis 8008 Load range C two years ago and they have worn very similarly to the Carlisles. Both seem to go down near 4/32 at 20-24K. Will probably try the Goodyear Endurance next.
The load rage D's maybe a little better . There sure was a big difference in handling the 2 different tires . Pat
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Old 01-03-2018, 11:08 PM   #9
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Ever read reviews and noticed people say good and bad things about the same product.

My original truck tires are Goodyear Wranglers. They have over 60,000 miles of pretty hard use on them. Still lot's of legal tread but I wanted to replace them before we head South in a few weeks.

At 30,000 miles I replaced two of the Goodyears. One had been damaged on the Alaska hwy. and I used the second as a "proper" spare. I put on two Michelins. They have about the same amount of tread left as the Goodyears with twice the milage.

I commented about this to the tire store and they made two comments. Yeah, Michelins don't seem to last as long and we'll give you two of the Goodyears at half price to replace them. Sounded good to me so tomorrow I'm back to all Goodyears.

Next will be trailer tires. Don't have the energy now to wade through all the pros and cons of each type. Enough tires for this week.

Ron
Ron after all the years of driving many years ago switched to Michelins and have been very happy . No more flats and long life .Our experience has only been with Michelin truck tires and bought the Defender Michelin's for the Subaru . Those are a newer tire for us so time will tell . But that has been our experience and that is all I can go buy . Pat
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Old 01-04-2018, 09:52 AM   #10
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I am currently using Nokian WRG3 tires on my Toyota 4Runner. I also had these tires on my previous vehicle which was a Ford Explorer. These tires are advertised as "all weather" tires. They are winter rated but are designed to be left on year round. They will last 80,000 km before they lose their winter rating but save the inconvenience of having to have two sets of tires for winter and summer use. Before discovering these tires we used Michelin X-ice in the winter and then changed in the spring to the normal all-seasons. The WRG3s perform like winter tires and have done well for us in all sorts of nasty winter conditions and have been used on some rough summer roads without any issues. I am still a couple of years away from changing the trailer tires but am contemplating putting WRG3s on the trailer if the right size is available. I have been caught in some winter weather when towing and think that having a winter rated tire on the trailer may be helpful.
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Old 01-04-2018, 10:19 AM   #11
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Ray, passenger vehicle tires and trailer tires are different. Trailer tires have a more rigid sidewall and the emphasis is on load rather than passenger comfort, since there are no passengers in the trailer. Nokian does not make trailer tires. In fact, they don't make a passenger tire in 205 75R15 (the size used on Escape) as far as I can tell.

Some folks run LT (light truck) tires on their trailer instead of ST (special trailer) tires, usually because of the load or speed rating. That's ok for the most part, because LT tires have a more rigid sidewall construction than passenger car tires as well.

I also doubt "snow tires" would make any difference towing a trailer, even if you found a suitable size. Those wheels don't steer are not under power from a drivetrain, but are just being pulled by the vehicle that does. Some locations do however require that you use chains on a trailer depending on road conditions.
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Old 01-04-2018, 05:12 PM   #12
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...................... Some locations do however require that you use chains on a trailer depending on road conditions.
Based on my research, at least for the 11 western mountain and west coast states, chains are required on any trailer axle that has brakes.
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Old 01-04-2018, 05:13 PM   #13
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The only aspect where a grippier winter tire would help on a trailer is in stopping it. Traction of the tires is key for the brakes to work. This is especially important in slippy winter conditions where your coefficient of friction is already greatly reduced by the road condition. Winter tires might make sense for someone doing more than occasional travel in such conditions. If such tires even exist.
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Old 01-04-2018, 05:25 PM   #14
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Winter tires might make sense for someone doing more than occasional travel in such conditions. If such tires even exist.
Yes, and that's a big if. I dont know of any.
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Old 01-04-2018, 05:35 PM   #15
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Based on my research, at least for the 11 western mountain and west coast states, chains are required on any trailer axle that has brakes.
In California, not ALL axles, just one, although it might be smart to chain up both.

"All vehicles towing trailers must have chains on one drive axle. Trailers with brakes must have chains on at least one axle. "
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Old 01-05-2018, 07:30 PM   #16
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I also doubt "snow tires" would make any difference towing a trailer, even if you found a suitable size. Those wheels don't steer are not under power from a drivetrain, but are just being pulled by the vehicle that does. Some locations do however require that you use chains on a trailer depending on road conditions.
Based on decades of driving experience in winter conditions involving snow, ice, and freezing rain, I can assure you that the lateral and braking traction of winter tires is much better in these conditions than that of summer tires. Since the trailer must go around corners and stop the tires on it have the same demands as any other non-driven tire... such as those on the rear of the front-wheel-drive cars that I have been driving in winter since 1984.

Chains normally help very little with lateral traction, but help braking traction (just as they help drive traction). Better braking traction reduces the problem of tires skidding (and thus loosing all directional control), and that's why some jurisdictions require their use on braked trailer wheels. A requirement for only one axle just means they want at least one axle to maintain some directional control; similarly some jurisdictions require only one axle of each drive axle group to be chained (as santacruzer mentioned).

Not being connected to steering gear does not mean that a tire has no need for lateral traction. Try to drive a front-wheel-drive vehicle with the rear tires sliding (just yank the handbrake on ice) and you'll appreciate the importance of this point; a trailer is arguably worse since it is hinged to the tow vehicle and thus less controlled. If anyone thinks that lateral grip doesn't matter to a trailer, they should put big casters on the ends of their trailer axles and try towing the thing.

You can use summer tires (which means every single ST tire sold) on trailer in winter conditions, and many do... just as many people use 3-season (sold as "all-season") tires on their cars and trucks all winter even here in Alberta. You can use winter tires on the front wheels and non-winter tires on the rear wheels of a front-wheel drive car... it can be really entertaining but some people do it, and towing on ice with winter tires on the tug and summer tires on the trailer is equivalent and common. That doesn't mean that winter tires wouldn't be better.


While there are no ST winter tires (as far as I know), there are lots of winter tires which are suitable for trailers; any commercial, LT, or "car" tire with a suitable load capacity will work. Personally, I think the Nokian WR mentioned earlier would be a good year-round choice - I have used them on my van and a car, and while their compromise is not effective enough for me to choose them again for year-round use on a car, the less-demanding trailer application seems like a good fit.
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Old 01-05-2018, 07:44 PM   #17
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I use the Nokian All-Weather tires, but mainly, I stay home and wait for the snow to melt.
Too many others out there on "All-Season" tires and I don't want to share the blame in a settlement, which is what usually happens.
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Old 01-05-2018, 07:59 PM   #18
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Does Nokian (or another manufacturer) make a winter tire in the 205 75R15?
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Old 01-05-2018, 08:37 PM   #19
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Does Nokian (or another manufacturer) make a winter tire in the 205 75R15?
Nokian makes the WR in a 205/70R15.
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Old 01-05-2018, 08:42 PM   #20
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Nokian makes the WR in a 205/70R15.
Ok, a lower profile. But you'd need an LT tire to be suitable on a trailer.
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