Giving up on an Escape 19... - Page 4 - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 02-21-2013, 10:58 AM   #31
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I too agree with Dave. For whatever reason, some vehicle's mpg drop precipitously when towing and others much less so. Part of it may well be due to different driving styles, but not all of it I believe.
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Old 02-21-2013, 11:01 AM   #32
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With my Pilot, I average about a 25-30% drop in fuel economy towing the 19, depending upon terrain and wind conditions. While substantial, the difference is well made up for when not towing.
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Old 02-21-2013, 11:06 AM   #33
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Mileage numbers when towing are hard to work with because we don't have a ready source of reliable data.

I do like to look at published ratings. I don't assume they're a match for real world circumstances, but I do assume that if this vehicle is rated 1 l/100km better than that vehicle, it's likely going to perform *about* 1 l/100km better in the real world in normal city/highway conditions. Assume a vehicle life span of about 200,000km (given our past history with vehicles) and an average fuel cost of $2/l over the life of the vehicle (wild-assed guess), and 1 l/100km difference in rating costs or saves about $4000 over the life of the vehicle. Maybe worth a $2000 difference in up-front costs.

But yeah, towing performance is a completely different game. No reliable data to make apples-to-apples comparisons whatsoever. So I just ignore the problem...
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Old 02-21-2013, 11:39 AM   #34
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You should consider:
Will this be you primary vehicle ?
Will you be hauling passengers or materials when you are not towing ?
How often will you be towing ?
There is a trade off between buying a marginal towing vehicle and a vehicle that has a larger capacity. A tow vehicle with smaller engine may be best for overall use but is worked harder when towing, resulting in more engine and drive train wear and lower mileage. A larger engine may have lower overall mileage but less of a mileage drop when towing.
In 2011 I bought a Toyota Tundra (regular cab, long bed, 5.7L V8 engine, 2WD). I opted for a pickup as I frequently haul materials. This is not my primary vehicle and not everyone has this convenience. The truck I drove and hauled with was a 2006 Toyota Tundra (regular cab, 8' bed, 4.3 L V6, 2WD) prior to purchasing this truck. We have been towing a 28', 6000lb GVWR, stick built dual axle TT aprox. 8k miles per year driving from the midwest through the west and north to the Pacific Northwest. The average difference in mileage between the two trucks has been 4 mpg "when towing". The 2011 Tundra has better safety features, more horse power when needed in the mountains, a 6 spd transmission, and does not work as hard on upgrades (downshifts).
I preffered a larger engine (V8 rather than relying on a smaller (V6 turbo ecoboost) engine to provide the power when needed resulting in less engine wear. Fuel mileage may suffer somewhat but I purchase vehicles for the long haul (expect 2k miles before reolacement) .
I retired in 2012 as a Certified Master Auto Technician with Advanced Engine Repair and Performance Certification and this experience was the basis for my decision making process.
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Old 02-21-2013, 12:02 PM   #35
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My situation: this will be my primary vehicle, used for commuting and run-about-town as well as our tow vehicle. For the next several years, mileage on the vehicle will typically be about 10K-15K/year "normal" use, and maybe 3K-5K/year towing. Once we get into full retirement, I expect those numbers to more-or-less reverse.

So in a sense this is a transition vehicle. It needs to do both reasonably well.

Or, we optimize for in town use with this vehicle and plan on trading it in when we retire, but I suspect that's not a good solution in terms of cost.

Hmmmm... just occurred to me... Or we optimize for in town use with this vehicle now, and it becomes my wife's primary around-town vehicle when she retires and we replace her current car with a vehicle optimized for towing. The timing is about right -- her car will be about 12 years old when she retires (according to current plans, at least) -- still a little young to get rid of, but not excessively so.
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Old 02-21-2013, 12:07 PM   #36
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I would agree that different vehicles drop fuel mileage at different rates when towing, but I would disagree with one statement that doug made about the real world ratings being proportional to the advertised, I have seen several cases of this not being true, I have been a Gm tech for 18 years and have seen several cases to proove my point. Thats why its always nice to talk to a honest owner and get real feed back. I know this can be difficult.
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Old 02-21-2013, 12:28 PM   #37
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yeah, can't say I'm surprised that assumption is wrong. I'm still going to hope it's somewhat correct, simply because there's no alternative source of information to base a comparison on. I suspect it's more likely correct (or closer to correct) for similar vehicles or for vehicles from the same manufacturer than for different types of vehicles from different manufacturers.

<edited to note> Talking to honest owners doesn't really help, since everybody drives differently. I suspect the lack of controlled circumstances talking to different people is a bigger error factor than any manufacturer fudging of numbers.

But, noted; take the numbers with a big grain of salt.
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Old 02-21-2013, 01:14 PM   #38
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Well, I can tell you that with pulling the 19 with my F250 with a Powerstroke diesel, my fuel economy drops very little at all, though was not all that great to start with. Towing though, especially through the mountains, I get better fuel economy from the F250 than I do from the Pilot.
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Old 02-21-2013, 01:18 PM   #39
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Trying to be honest here. My 2011 Toyota FJ Cruiser gets almost dead on the factory reported mileage when not towing (about 19 mpg Imp city and 25 mpg Imp highway). Although I have not yet towed my Escape 19', I have experienced about a 20 - 25 percent drop in gas mileage when towing a somewhat lighter trailer than the 19'. Of course, I have in the past continued to drive at fairly high speeds when towing (typically 110 - 120 kph), but I will make an attempt to slow down a bit with the 19'. Speaking of manufacturer's claims being wrong, my wife's 2010 Chev Equinox gets nothing close to the manufacturers estimated fuel consumption (typically about 25% poorer than manufacturer's claims).
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Old 02-21-2013, 01:25 PM   #40
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The Liberty gets 8.7 K per L avg. ..... towing the Escape 15 it's down to 6.9 K per L avg. that pretty much just in the mtns. hope for better in the prairies....
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