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Old 02-15-2016, 03:06 PM   #81
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Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
A Hepvo valve is a one-way flexible valve. By staying closed when there is no water to drain, it blocks gases from the waste tank without requiring a volume of trapped water the way a P-trap does. The Hepvo won't be dry (there's no airflow to dry it out), but at least it won't hold much water. The main purpose for these devices is to avoid the problem of water splashing out of a P-trap during travel, losing the gas seal. Some people also use them as a more compact solution in under-floor installations to avoid low-hanging plumbing, but that's not an issue in an Escape as far as I know.
Hi Brian did check the site Jim gave me . It will help this situation but the part I did not like was a 3 year life span . For now I am just going to make sure I keep using bleach solution and keeping that part of plumbing clean when I get home . Pat
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Old 02-15-2016, 03:09 PM   #82
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Mainly, it's just keep water in the P-trap.
If you close the strainer, it will prevent water from splashing up and from evaporating. ( it's in the manual - close for travel ).
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Old 02-15-2016, 03:12 PM   #83
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I screw one end of my hose into the other for storage, to keep crud in the hose to a minimum.
I use this idea, and I use it with anything that has mating connectors on each end, including propane extensions (less purge time needed when they are used, and no dirt) and electrical cords (keeps the cord tidy and plug blades clean).
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Old 02-15-2016, 03:14 PM   #84
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Bleach is not a washing solution. It won't clean anything. It kills organisms and nothing more.
Yep, back to that Michigan State University explanation, this time to the difference between cleaning and sanitizing.
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Old 02-15-2016, 03:15 PM   #85
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I think one of the best ways to keep bacterial "gunk" out of water hoses is to make sure that they dry out completely before you store them.
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I have no idea how one would accomplish that ( especially in BC ).
You could blow it out with compressed air, using the same fitting used to blow out the trailer's freshwater plumbing to winterize. But really, who is doing that when packing up at a campsite?
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Old 02-15-2016, 03:25 PM   #86
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Mainly, it's just keep water in the P-trap.
If you close the strainer, it will prevent water from splashing up and from evaporating. ( it's in the manual - close for travel ).
Site says it will work for my situation . Never had water splash out . The problem is the water in there if not continually flushed gets real nasty and stinks real bad . When I took it apart there was a lot of stuff growing , hence the stink . Pat
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Old 02-15-2016, 03:28 PM   #87
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We just use 4’ – 5’ of clear ˝” PEX tubing with a hose connection on one end. Slips right into the fresh water fill port. Small, light and easy to manipulate.
Four to five feet, to go all the way to the tank through the large-diameter fill hose, or four to five inches, to make it easy to couple a hose to the fill port? The short adapter is easy to easy to build, but available as a ready-made RV accessory.

Since fill fittings are almost always horizontal, this sort of adapter should include an elbow so the hose can hang down, although the Camco 40003 is missing that.

I didn't think you could get clear PEX, so I assume you mean translucent non-coloured PEX (rather than the common red and blue colours). Often the short adapters are made with vinyl tubing, which is actually clear and is more flexible.
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Old 02-15-2016, 03:34 PM   #88
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... but if you connected to the city water inlet you would not sanitize the tank.
True in a stock Escape, and most travel trailers, but some RVs have a quarter-turn three-way diverter valve to direct incoming water from the inlet either to direct use (like a conventional city water inlet) or to the freshwater tank for filling. And of course, as already discussed, you can fill the tank through the normal gravity fresh water fill with a hose and adapter.
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Old 02-15-2016, 07:25 PM   #89
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So I discussed this thread with a good friend of mine, a former head technologist of the hospital’s microbiology lab, and thought I would summarize my thoughts in light of this. Her department cultured the many water samples I submitted on a weekly basis for our purified water systems, and also from the renal unit water system. There is too much for a post, so if you care to read more open this PDF file. Dealing with microorganism growth and sanitization is similar for both water purification systems and RV water systems, even if the quality targets are different.

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Old 02-15-2016, 07:38 PM   #90
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Excellent work Bob.
I suspect you may be a little over-cautious since I think you are on the same water system as I am ( in North Van ) and the water is chlorinated, coming out of the tap.
I almost always fill my tank at home where I often smell chlorine in the water when making coffee.
I'm thinking that will help prevent contamination of my tank.
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Old 02-15-2016, 09:45 PM   #91
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I mostly run the same water through my trailer, as I do through my home, and I have never heard of sanitizing a system at home. I am curious as to what difference there is, and why we need more precaution with the trailer system? Is it maybe more of a concern if you are drawing water from sources other than your own home system?
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Old 02-15-2016, 09:52 PM   #92
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I think the issue is with leaving it stagnant. Home water supply is in constant use.
Even at that, I recall being told under some circumstances to run the water in homes for a minute or so before filling a cup for consumption. ( maybe was to do with lead solder ).
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Old 02-15-2016, 09:55 PM   #93
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I think the issue is with leaving it stagnant. Home water supply is in constant use.
Even at that, I recall being told under some circumstances to run the water in homes for a minute or so before filling a cup for consumption. ( maybe was to do with lead solder ).
That could be, but what about homes that are left unoccupied by travelling owners for long periods? They have no means of any kind of treatment.
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Old 02-15-2016, 09:57 PM   #94
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Nope, but they would be advised to run the taps before pouring a glass of water.
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Old 02-15-2016, 10:00 PM   #95
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Four to five feet, to go all the way to the tank through the large-diameter fill hose, or four to five inches, to make it easy to couple a hose to the fill port? The short adapter is easy to easy to build, but available as a ready-made RV accessory.

Since fill fittings are almost always horizontal, this sort of adapter should include an elbow so the hose can hang down, although the Camco 40003 is missing that.

I didn't think you could get clear PEX, so I assume you mean translucent non-coloured PEX (rather than the common red and blue colours). Often the short adapters are made with vinyl tubing, which is actually clear and is more flexible.
Thank you Brian, I stand corrected. It is actually low pressure PVC clear tubing, with a barbed hose connection. Scott

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Old 02-15-2016, 10:13 PM   #96
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So I discussed this thread with a good friend of mine, a former head technologist of the hospital’s microbiology lab, and thought I would summarize my thoughts in light of this. Her department cultured the many water samples I submitted on a weekly basis for our purified water systems, and also from the renal unit water system. There is too much for a post, so if you care to read more open this PDF file. Dealing with microorganism growth and sanitization is similar for both water purification systems and RV water systems, even if the quality targets are different.

Bob K
Thanks for a great article Bob.
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Old 02-15-2016, 11:15 PM   #97
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A home is a closed system with a public health office monitoring the quality of your water, whereas, a trailer is an open system with holding tanks and no monitoring. The public water system occasionally gets purges with chlorine when coliform counts rise and extra filtration. Homes with their own wells require water testing in some jurisdictions and mandated corrective measures. Check out your local public health office's website for how they manage your water - it's an active process.
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Old 02-15-2016, 11:22 PM   #98
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I purchased a used 17b several months ago that had not been properly maintained (green algae like ook coming out of the taps). I bleached and rinsed several times. No more green gook. But I'm still left with nagging doubts, particularly after the discussion of membrane forming bacterial colonies. I just found this product on Amazon, however, ghat tests specifically for this, so I'll be giving this a shot. Appears to be manufactured by a company that specializes in lab equipment and kits for water testing. Hach 2432409 BART Test, Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, (Pack of 9) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00N3ZP8QK..._5hRWwb87J5NJN
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Old 02-15-2016, 11:26 PM   #99
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So I discussed this thread with a good friend of mine, a former head technologist of the hospital’s microbiology lab, and thought I would summarize my thoughts in light of this. Her department cultured the many water samples I submitted on a weekly basis for our purified water systems, and also from the renal unit water system. There is too much for a post, so if you care to read more open this PDF file. Dealing with microorganism growth and sanitization is similar for both water purification systems and RV water systems, even if the quality targets are different.

Bob K
Bob I want to Thankyou for this information . As well as having a RV , I also have a pool with a vinyl liner . A few years ago I had a problem with bio film in my pool . There was at the time a push to move from chorine in your pool and use this product that didn't smell , discolor anything and be soft on your skin . So I tried it for 3 1/2 years . The first 2 everything was great . Then year 3 I found this slimy bio film floating and attaching to pool walls . The company kept adding more chemicals which didn't work . I gave it a good try knowing chorine is also a dangerous chemical , I wanted it to work . Finally for the last time cleaning out the filter , emptying the pool, having to get in and scrub off this bio film off the walls with bleach rags . I got rid of it . Keep in mind filter and circulating your water is very important . Didn't matter this stuff keep growing . I refilled my pool and went back to chorine . I think it is now 7 years or maybe more . Never have had a problem again . So I will read this PDF . I am always willing to learn . This information will help me with the trailer and my pool . Pat
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Old 02-16-2016, 01:14 AM   #100
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sanitizing tank and lines

A trailer is more susceptible to microorganism water supply growth than your home because:

1. Water sitting in the tank is stagnant when the trailer is not in motion. Even drawing water from the tank isn't likely to prevent the bacteria growing on surfaces over time. If you had a holding tank as part of your home water system it would also be more susceptible to microorganism colonizing.



2. Bleach (hypochlorite) in chlorinated water from your home supply will be neutralized by heat or light, or evaporate into empty space in the trailer's tank if left standing.This allows the organisms to grow and colonize the system unless the water is circulating adequately and frequently.



3. I'm only guessing at this, but perhaps the speed at which water circulates through your house's water pipes is so much faster than in your trailer that it scrubs away biomasses that can form when water sits in them for long periods of time. Or is it that copper might inhibit the growth? I will see if I can find something on this.

Added later:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti...ties_of_copper


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