Compressed air winterization at a gas station? - Escape Trailer Owners Community

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Old 02-01-2017, 07:29 PM   #1
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Compressed air winterization at a gas station?

Properly sized air compressors seem to be fairly expensive and bulky. Instead, I was wondering if it would be possible to winterize a trailer at one of those tire inflation stations that you see at many gas stations? I'm guessing these industrial units are probably not oilless, so it would be good to get an oil extraction filter as mentioned in Purging water for winterizing
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Old 02-01-2017, 07:38 PM   #2
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Too many quarters for what 3 minutes. May take you 5 times to do the whole unit. Just get the ez winterization option, uses the on board pump
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Old 02-01-2017, 07:53 PM   #3
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I would also try one of the air mattress inflators; not a lot of pressure but a lot of volume. I have a 120v unit which is very powerful and a less powerful Coleman brand which runs off of 4 D cell batteries.
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Old 02-01-2017, 08:28 PM   #4
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Many of us use no compressed air, only anti-freeze. Escape will now supply a kit for simply pumping the anti-freeze with your water pump up into lines, bypassing hot water tank. None in fresh tank.
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Old 02-01-2017, 08:39 PM   #5
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I have a 6 gal. compressor, but I'm back to using a pump and RV anti-freeze because when I open the taps and see pink fluid coming out, I know the job is done.
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Old 02-01-2017, 08:44 PM   #6
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Going to be a bear to do so, you'll have to jury rig a tire valve onto the water hose connection, then hold the tire inflator onto the valve while your partner bleeds all the water out of the system. It'd all depend on how much volume the service station provides. If I didn't want to spring for a good portable air compressor, I'd go the anti freeze route like Jim mentions.
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Old 02-01-2017, 09:07 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by SFDavis50 View Post
I would also try one of the air mattress inflators; not a lot of pressure but a lot of volume. I have a 120v unit which is very powerful and a less powerful Coleman brand which runs off of 4 D cell batteries.
Interesting. Given earlier discussions about big horsepower range air compressors, I hadn't considered small air mattress inflators.

I suppose, from a physics point of view, almost all of the pressure that would be required to push out water from a hose would not be from friction between the water and the hose, but rather from the difference in height between the intake and outtake ends, and the weight of water in between those two points. 1 foot of water exerts 0.43 PSI, and since the distance from the city water connection to the top of the sink faucet is maybe 2-3 feet (as a guess), you'd need a maximum of about 1 PSI. You don't even need that much since the instructions say to use the Escape pump first to pre-clear the lines, so you should only have to push up a residual amount of water and therefore a fractional PSI. Once the lines are clear, you'd prefer a high CFM pump over a high PSI pump to blow out any droplets and the water at any low points in the system.

This V1 mini air inflator might suit the bill. It's tiny, only 0.4 lb in weight, 12 volt, $12, has 0.25 PSI, and 3.7 CFM:

https://www.amazon.com/V1-Motor-Port.../dp/B0122A2XM8

So my next question would be, if you use an air mattress inflator, do you still need to worry about oil contaminating the water lines? Good oil filters seem to be expensive, although they are thankfully small and light.
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Old 02-01-2017, 09:21 PM   #8
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Going to be a bear to do so, you'll have to jury rig a tire valve onto the water hose connection, then hold the tire inflator onto the valve while your partner bleeds all the water out of the system. It'd all depend on how much volume the service station provides. If I didn't want to spring for a good portable air compressor, I'd go the anti freeze route like Jim mentions.
Sure, it might take a few minutes, which is probably longer than winterizing with antifreeze. If I understand the process correctly though, I think it should work if I leave all the taps open, go to the exterior, attach a city water intake to Schrader valve connection (Campco makes one), then hold the station's tire inflator to it for a few minutes. I'm leaving out the oil filter, but I haven't figured out yet if that's required on these industrial units.
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Old 02-01-2017, 09:31 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulk View Post
Interesting. Given earlier discussions about big horsepower range air compressors, I hadn't considered small air mattress inflators.

I suppose, from a physics point of view, almost all of the pressure that would be required to push out water from a hose would not be from friction between the water and the hose, but rather from the difference in height between the intake and outtake ends, and the weight of water in between those two points. 1 foot of water exerts 0.43 PSI, and since the distance from the city water connection to the top of the sink faucet is maybe 2-3 feet (as a guess), you'd need a maximum of about 1 PSI. You don't even need that much since the instructions say to use the Escape pump first to pre-clear the lines, so you should only have to push up a residual amount of water and therefore a fractional PSI. Once the lines are clear, you'd prefer a high CFM pump over a high PSI pump to blow out any droplets and the water at any low points in the system.

This V1 mini air inflator might suit the bill. It's tiny, only 0.4 lb in weight, 12 volt, $12, has 0.25 PSI, and 3.7 CFM:

https://www.amazon.com/V1-Motor-Port.../dp/B0122A2XM8

So my next question would be, if you use an air mattress inflator, do you still need to worry about oil contaminating the water lines? Good oil filters seem to be expensive, although they are thankfully small and light.
I think in reality you would be better served with more pressure and volume. I don't see this working well or at all. Plus how would you connect it to the city water line? It only has fittings for tubes or mattress. Others have mentioned trying a Viair 12V compressor but not sure how they work in practice as I haven't seen a first hand report. The small compressor designs are oil-less.
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Old 02-01-2017, 09:35 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by rubicon327 View Post
I think in reality you would be better served with more pressure and volume. I don't see this working well or at all. Plus how would you connect it to the city water line? It only has fittings for tubes or mattress. Others have mentioned trying a Viair 12V compressor but not sure how they work in practice as I haven't seen a first hand report. The small compressor designs are oil-less.
According to this post First time owner may have to winterize while on the road seeks advice the Viair model 88P was judged as sufficient to winterize the trailer. That model has a CFM of 1.47 CFM, which is lower than the much smaller and less costly V1 motor, albeit at a much higher PSI.

I wouldn't naturally assume this would work either, but SFDavis50 seems to have experience using smaller pumps if I'm reading his reply correctly, and I'm just trying to figure out why this might be.

The connection issue is still something to figure out..

For $12, I might be willing to try it out though to find out, unless someone has a counter example
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